Sunday, November 30, 2008

Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye!

After last Sunday's burns caused by Yuvvraaj, I was not willing to go out for a movie this weekend. Anyway there were not many releases this Friday, and I had almost seen all the previous ones. PP had wanted to watch one, and had suggested Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye!. But to her sheer disbelief, I had not bought tickets in advance and had half expected we wouldn't get them over the counter. I knew this was only wishful thinking because all theatres were less than half-booked even by late afternoon, I guess due to a sense of mourning for (or fear of?) the Mumbai Massacre.

So we still had seats available after the bloke ahead in queue had wanted 9 tickets and took 9 months deciding between Gold and Silver. As we settled in our seats and went through promos, I prayed for Abhay Deol, Paresh Rawal and Khosla Ka Ghosla director Dibakar Banerjee. None of them disappointed me in the comical drama that takes us first through the adolescent life of Lucky, and then his excursions in his profession, giving us a detailed tour through residential areas of Delhi from Tilak Nagar to Rajouri Garden and Rohini to Defence Colony.

The narrative keeps you bound and you don't feel bored for a minute. Intelligent use of still photographs has been used more than once to fast forward the movie. The screenplay is great, and the humour is good, non-cheesy, and light without much of other emotions, though you feel a bit sorry for the parents. Otherwise the movie is strewn with laughter throughout, both during the present Lucky and the past. Money is shown as the biggest power. The music is all Punjabi but not that good, except the title track. But since most of the songs play in the background, they did not seem to be needlessly inserted and did not obstruct the flow.

Abhay Deol seems to have developed a knack for signing up the most hat-ke low-budget movies that are all different from each other and are critically acclaimed. OLLO is no exception. The dimpled actor keeps his innocent smile even when he is wanted by the police. Paresh Rawal was not his usual timid, mindless comedian but played three powerful, intelligent characters, as Lucky's father (not as strong as the other two), and the other two characters who patronize Lucky at different times. Some good serious acting on his part. Neetu Chandra was sweet but did not have much screen time.

Though it might be too early but Dibakar Banerjee's second venture shows a trend here. Quite a few similarities can be drawn between national-award winning Khosla Ka Ghosla and this one, the most prominent being being shot in Delhi and the use of local Delhi language, a mix of Hindi, Punjabi and Haryanwi. The movie might not qualify for the national award this year, nor the director, but he has nevertheless done a very good job in writing and directing a script so well.

To sum it up, Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye! was full paisa-vasool, though I would have loved it on the small screen too. My verdict: 8 on 10.


22 comments:

Ashutosh said...

definitely this movie deserves good review stars... ek dam "paisa vasool". May be considered for a private collection.

Rishabh Makrand said...

Nice to see Paresh rawal in various roles like Sanjeev Kumar in "naya din nayi raat"(he played 9 characters in that movie).
Since movie was encircling Abhay so people didnt enjoyed the presence of "Garam Masala" actress much.
Best part was "Get well Soon" card...
over all total "paisa vasool" movie..

Garima said...

Thanks for leavin ur valuable updates ...actually helps us to decide between a theatre or a home watch :)

Anadi Misra said...

Abhey Deol has been involved with one good project after another...what I don't get is, and perhaps you can help me here, I don't think he is a very talented actor...

He is restrained, more relatable...and has a great knack for choosing scripts...
one wishes that a good producer could have converted them to huge money spinners by good marketing, something I felt while watching Ek Chaalis (I know, you bashed it!) and he too acknowledged in a recent interview as the flip side of working with 1st time directors (like the JWM guy) till this one...

However, from a pure acting point of view, he isn't very great (yet)...lacks both range and height :P...but the common-man relatability aspect, I wonder if it makes him the Amol Palekar of this generation?

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Cuckoo said...

Ok, so I can watch it now. :)

ashes said...

Ashutosh:

Yeah right. Let me know when Moserbaer launches the Rs 40-DVD.

ashes said...

Rishabh:

The Garam Masala actress anyway did not have much role, and her character did not require much acting (though the girl who played her sister Dolly acted pathetically). She went unnoticed in Garam Masala as well because she shared a third of the female screen presence there.

Get-Well-Soon card was definitely good, in fact, the entire restaurant-first-date sequence was super.

ashes said...

Garima:

So where'd you watch OLLO? Theatre or home theatre?

ashes said...

Anadi:

I rated Ek Chalees Ki Last Local as 8 on 10, and I really liked that one; it was quite different than movies made in India. And though I do not like that kind of Hollywood movies too much, I liked this one and as I said, it was perhaps the first Hindi 'pulp fiction' in the true sense.

Anyway, I agree that Abhay Deol is more relateable to the common man, and perhaps that is what makes him good. I've seen only the aforesaid two movies of his, and I liked him. He might not be that versatile an actor, and now that you pointed out, I also feel he doesn't have to 'act' much to portray the characters he has done.

But I feel if good producers start into movies as OLLO and 1:40, they will spoil the fun. The best part of these movies is shooting in streets and no opulent sets at all, which rich producers would not be able to constrain themselves in.

ashes said...

Alpesh:

THanks for the info. I shall go ahead and create an account in linq.

ashes said...

Cuckoo:

What is your criteria of watching? The ones I rate 8 or above?

Indigo said...

Now this seems to be you. All praise and positive.

I did not like it much because I had trouble following the dialect especially during the initial part of Lucky's childhood.

ashes said...

Indigo:

Thanks. :)

Yes, the initial part is laden with Punjabi, but it very beautifully shows a typical small-town household and neighbourhood. It seems Hindi is not your first language, otherwise that would have not been difficult to comprehend.

Cuckoo said...

Oh yeah ! In a way. :)

Rahi said...

I liked the movie too. Because of the association with Delhi, it felt as if its happening closeby. I cud identify wid the roads. but this was not all. i have liked abhay deol in each of his films. his acting is like someone from a boy next door - now that is what we want - i don't want the hero to jump multi-storeyed buildings unscathed

ashes said...

Rahi:

Exactly, we enjoy Abhay Deol's boy-next-door look, and the movie was as if shot in the neighbourhood.

Welcome on my blog. Hope to see you back again.

Anadi Misra said...

Just saw it.I would give it a 7. was enjoyable in bits and pieces.Young Lucky was a better actor of the two :), and I liked that sub-plot...Thodi disjointed si thi.Poor editing perhaps, or maybe a flaw at the script level...or perhaps an attempt to give snapshots rather than a continuous narrative...sub-plots under-developed the and were very open-ended (one might argue that its real life though). Character graph thoda sketchy sa tha...as if jyads soch ke nahi likha, no layering, very little depth.

Honestly, agar flop hui hai, so there is no other reason except that it was a flawed, though well-intentioned effort (even as I say t, I feel silly, what does that well intentioned mean afterall in the context of movie business, a movie is bound to be judged professionally, not by intent, but theek hai, keh diya to rehne deta hoon :D)

ashes said...

Anadi:

So you didn't like it :) Actually the non-smooth narrative, the album snapshots, is what I quite liked. They were different, disjointed incidents that had very little in common. One thing that disturbed was Paresh Rawal in all the subplots. The younger part was definitely funnier.

Well-intentioned effort :) Intention to har director/producer ka achchha hi hota hai in his own way. Some want to make money by making movies appealing to the masses, some others make classy movies likeable by a select few. I always like the second category. Therefore a movie being hit or flop does not influence my judgement about it being good or bad.

Anadi Misra said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anadi Misra said...

Yaar, I don't have any complaints about the use of that technique, but I still believe it lacked finesse...

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